Stay Safe in the Sun!

Posted by Patti Sciulli on May 30, 2019

As we head into the summer months, I hope you’ll keep your skin’s health – present and future – in mind. Use the following tips to stay safe in the sun.

  1. Wear protective clothing. Hats with wide brims not only cover your face, but they also protect other easy-to-forget spots like ears and your scalp.
  2. Make sunglasses your favorite accessory. Sunglasses shield your eyes from UV rays that can cause eye problems, like cataracts. Look for a pair that says it blocks 99% or 100% of UVB and UVA rays.
  3. Limit your sun time, especially between 10 am and 4 pm. That’s the time when the sun’s rays are at their strongest. Plan your outdoor activities early in the morning or later in the afternoon.
  4. Use sunscreen and use it right. UV rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. To protect your skin, put sunscreen on every part of your body that will be exposed to the sun at least 15 minutes before going outside, even if it’s cloudy out. When choosing a sunscreen, pick one with at least SPF 15 and one that offers broad spectrum protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. You need to reapply sunscreen every 2 hours, and don’t forget to put it on your feet and hands and to reapply after swimming and sweating.
  5. Say no to Tanning. There’s no such thing as a safe tan, whether you choose inside or outside. It’s a myth that indoor tanning is a safer alternative to sun tanning. Tanning beds expose you to intense UV radiation, which increases your risk of skin cancer and skin damage.
  6. Give up the Vitamin D excuse. Tanning is not a safe way to get Vitamin D. If you’re concerned about your Vitamin D levels, talk to your doctor about the sources that are best for you.
  7. Get to know your skin. Skin cancer is easy to treat when caught early, so get to know your skin and watch for changes. Look for new skin markings, like moles, bumps, scaly spots, or places where your skin has changed color. Take note if a mole has uneven edges, differences in color, or one half that is different than the other. You can also watch for moles, sores, or growths that continue to bleed, won’t heal, or look different from any other growth you may have. Talk to your doctor if you notice any of these changes.

“Push harder than yesterday if you want a different tomorrow.”

Patti Sciulli is the JCC’s Group Exercise/Wellness Director. Questions? Contact Patti and she’ll get back to you shortly: 

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